Friday, November 28, 2008

Gorilla Marketing

- Ritchie Blackmore's incessant riff that drives "Smoke on the Water".

- Randy Bachman's stutter on "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet".

- The ominous chimes that herald impending doom with AC/DC's, "Hells Bells".

- Tom Hamilton's hypnotic bass line on "Sweet Emotion".

- Ozzy's shrieking that opens "Crazy Train".

Signature moments in classic rock songs have a way of stamping themselves into our collective musical psyches. Few are as memorable or powerful as the Phil Collins drum crash that punctuates "In the Air Tonight".

But what happens when a chocolate bar company decides to mix that musical climax with a 400-pound gorilla?



One of my new BFF's told me about this Cadbury commercial in the back of our limo the other day as we headed back to another rocking session at PropertyGuys.com University.

Little time was wasted in looking this up and learning this spot has generated more than 3.2 million YouTube hits, also sparking a massive viral dialogue, debating its artistic and commercial merits.

Feel free to let us know if this works for you or not.


"Beyond a certain point, the music isn't mine anymore. It's yours"
PHIL COLLINS


P.S. ... Thanks for the heads up on this one Allie!



http://www.seamlessbrand.com/



3 comments:

Mike Shanks PSP said...

Someone watching it in this context is very different than on TV. On TV this would knock you socks off the first time you see it.

On Youtube it is scrutinized a little closer, specially when sent with some lead up.

I think it allows you to feel the raw emotion of the song in a whole new way. How many times I have pounded out that drumroll I don't know, but I will now always do it with a gorilla on the brain!

M

Andrew M said...

Gair I can't believe you forgot that it was me who brought up the Gorilla ad, not Allison.

That hurts my feelings. Those damned ad folks are always stealing my credit.

The ad is a fantastic example of how to use creative video content to "go viral" online.

However the real value in watching the ad only comes when you ask the question: what chocolate bar was it advertising?

I'm willing to bet that most people have no idea. That ad actually has well over 10 million views on YouTube. People all over the world have seen it and even created and uploaded spoofs of it online.

Most of them have no idea which chocolate bar it was an ad for. Do you remember?

The next time Mike hears that song, and the fantastic drum intro starts, he'll be thinking of a gorilla - not the Cadbury's Dairy Milk Bar that the ad was designed to promote. A Glass and a Half of Joy.

The lesson is that if your message isn't clear and defined then it doesn't matter if you manage to attract the attention of 10 million people, all they'll see is a gorilla playing a great Phil Collins song.

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